Allison

(b.)

Interview by Mo Fink.
Photography by Amara Hartman.

You can’t walk by (b.) Resale without going in. Even when you’re short on cash and time, you make it work, if for nothing else than to catch up with the genuine staff running it. Allison Bross-White, the owner and visionary behind it, proves that every business is a pulpit, and her message is one of inclusion–and she means it.

From the bathroom stalls-turned-dressing rooms sharpied up by any person with a thought to share, to the pictures hanging behind the counter of Minneapolis natives of every color and background, her aim is to allow self expression in whatever freaky or vanilla form. We caught up over donuts and launched right into how her shop started.

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Updates

Hello out there! I hope you’re all enjoying this spring weather! The sun is finally shining for longer than two hours here in Minneapolis, so I’m pretty happy. We’ve also got some new stuff around here to make you happy, as well. Check it out! ☀️

  • Nonprofit work has shed its image of just glorified volunteerism. And, it’s a popular career choice for women. Our feature article looks at the valuable work nonprofits do and how women can contribute to their community.
  • Little Dragon drops savvy disco-electronic sound with their latest album, Season High. Read a review written by our new guest writer Casey Holmstrom.
  • Love is real, but people are hard. Our relationship writer Katie Eckhardt wants to talk with you about it. Send your dating questions or thoughts to info@smashupmagazine.com, and we’ll publish a Q & A. You can remain anonymous.

Nonprofit Work and Women

Most of us have been fattened for the 9-to-5 grind since high school, and herded to the proverbial slaughter through college and then the workforce. Many pursue practical degrees meant to secure a steady paycheck. Business, marketing, or the omnipresent communications degrees are popular. If you chose a more creative path (theater, art, writing), you’ve probably been met with a blank stare. “What kind of jobs are there for that?”

It’s ingrained in our society that success comes to the common working man only through being tethered to the same job for years, putting up with the daily grind, always keeping in mind what you stand to lose if you quit. Some people genuinely thrive in a traditional corporate environment. These jobs can be reliable. They offer structure and security; without them, many of the products we use every day wouldn’t exist.

Friends and I have lamented all the responsibilities we’ve loaded up on ourselves that would be hard or impossible to manage if we quit our jobs tomorrow.

A drawback, though, is that you’re locked into whatever vision the company promotes or where it wants to go. For-profit companies have owners and shareholders, and at the end of the day, any profit is meant to go back in their pockets. You know, the invisible “man” somewhere out there who everyone either hates or has sadly resigned themselves to. The entire thing is meant to be a closed loop. There isn’t a lot of creative wiggle room or many chances for employees to spread their wings besides “moving up the ladder.”

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