Wonder Woman

Hollywood Doubles Down on Preserving Male Identification in Film

Written by Simone LeClaire.

Wonder Woman, Movie, Gal Gadot
Image via Newsweek

Wonder Woman correctly predicts the novel existence of female protagonist is beyond enough to satisfy female audiences.

Let me first say, I came out of this film laughing and rolling my eyes a little, having went in with little expectations and seen basically exactly what I would expect to see from Hollywood. I was much too unsurprised to be disappointed or mad. So I would not be writing this review if not for my dawning, incredulous realization of the outpouring of starry-eyed wonder at this flick.

People. Slow. Your. Roll.

If you enjoy the film, great. I’m not trying to take that away from you. If you appreciate the historic milestone of a female director in a blockbuster superhero movie breaking all financial success expectations–you’re right, great.

But to wildly herald Wonder Woman as some sort of catch all “answer to feminism” does such incredible violence to the filmmakers–women and men–who have actually striven to put powerful, authentic characterizations of femaleness on the screen and to build stories around them in unafraid ways. Wonder Woman is a textbook example of how far Hollywood will go to preserve male identification on screen. Everything “feminist” about this film is apparent in the most basic elements of the plot itself–a powerful woman exists and tries to save the world. Go any deeper, and the cinematic execution of the piece clearly & immediately reveals the familiar, deep maleness of the system that made it and how terrified they are to touch this kind of story.

Continue reading “Wonder Woman”

😳

Hey,  people. Apologies for the absence. A couple things are going on, one affected by the other. A few weeks ago I decided to try to streamline the content here so we can give you even stronger, kick ass quality. I have plans to gather the team and contributors to really knuckle down and spruce things up. In the meantime, my grandpa died. So, where I planned to start tweaking and ferreting around, this time has turned into a reflective, quiet pocket. 

I’m still out here, just  thinking about things, waiting, giving myself space. I wanted to give viewers and followers a heads up because your support and interest is valuable to me, we’re all in this wacky life together, and you’re owed an update.

We’ll be back soon! 

🖤

Amara  

Updates

Hello out there! I hope you’re all enjoying this spring weather! The sun is finally shining for longer than two hours here in Minneapolis, so I’m pretty happy. We’ve also got some new stuff around here to make you happy, as well. Check it out! ☀️

  • Nonprofit work has shed its image of just glorified volunteerism. And, it’s a popular career choice for women. Our feature article looks at the valuable work nonprofits do and how women can contribute to their community.
  • Little Dragon drops savvy disco-electronic sound with their latest album, Season High. Read a review written by our new guest writer Casey Holmstrom.
  • Love is real, but people are hard. Our relationship writer Katie Eckhardt wants to talk with you about it. Send your dating questions or thoughts to info@smashupmagazine.com, and we’ll publish a Q & A. You can remain anonymous.

Abortion.

A great interview with Dr. Willie Parker just went up on Jezebel.com. I encourage you all to read it. He gets at the core of a lot of the abortion and female rights debate by addressing human need. He is also a Christian, which adds an intersectional element most people want to ignore or say isn’t valid in this age. His thoughts are introspective and researched. I applaud him!

willie_parker
Image via Salon.com.

Here are some pull quotes:

In your book, you write about how the religious right has hijacked moral authority over the abortion debate and that the left has failed to come up with a similar moral argument. What moral argument should the left present?

The left has failed to come up with an argument because the left has conceded on the basis of, what I think, is an intellectual arrogance. They think that the facts will speak for themselves and they think that religion is so antiquated—some people even think that we live in a post-religious world; that nobody really believes in God or prayer. That has opened a space that the people who are opposed to abortion have been more than willing to fill with misinformation and encroachment of other peoples’ ability to make their decisions.

The argument that I have, with regard to abortion being a moral issue (and not necessarily a religious one) is that I believe that men and women are equal in their agency. If women have moral agency and autonomy, that means that all processes that occur in their body should be governed only by that woman’s decision-making. So what that means is that people should not be able to have laws that will allow them to be preoccupied with the well-being of a fetus that a woman’s carrying than they are with the woman. You can’t care more about the fetus that a woman’s carrying than you do about the woman who’s carrying it.

Continue reading “Abortion.”

Updates

Wakey, wakey! We’ve got some new items of interest for you!

  • A new excursion down the rabbit hole with a two-part interview about the good and the not-so-good in ourselves.
  • Are you dream happy (think, trigger happy)? Our culture tells us relationships will make us happy, but that’s obviously not always true.
  • A review of the horror movie XX. It’s a unique and thought-provoking anthology that puts a new twist on what’s really scary.